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Spooky Stations and stories

RAF Odiham’s Military Working Dogs have joined in with the Halloween celebrations, by getting spooky for the season.

Image shows Military Working Dog sitting by a sign for RAF Odiham and pumpkins.

The Section draped spider webbing and carved dog silhouettes and paw prints into pumpkins to celebrate.

And if these dogs are not spooky enough for you, here are some ‘tails’ of strange stories from bygone World War Two RAF Stations.

Image shows Military Working Dog sitting by a sign for RAF Odiham and pumpkins.

RAF Wickenby, Lincolnshire

RAF Wickenby is now long abandoned except for footsteps,scraping sounds and spooky shapes stirring on the wall. A RAF pilot has even appeared momentarily.

Michael Bentine, famous for 'The Goon Show', worked at Wickenby during the war as an Intelligence Officer. One night, Bentine greeted his colleague 'Pop,’ only to later discovered that Pop had actually died two days earlier.

Along with Pop, 1,080 lives were lost from RAF Wickenby and are now commemorated at a memorial in the area.

Image shows Military Working Dog sitting by a sign for RAF Odiham and pumpkins.

RAF Binbrook, Lincolnshire

The old RAF Binbrook Officers' Mess is allegedly haunted. Ghostly sightings of Sergeant Sinclair lurking the airfield have been reported; an Australian worker who reportedly blew himself up attempting to damage a Lancaster Bomber during World War Two.

Image shows Military Working Dog sitting by a sign for RAF Odiham and pumpkins.

RAF Metheringham, Lincolnshire

The airfield at RAF Metheringham is a hotspot for hauntings. Fleeting figures of a young Women's Auxiliary Air Force aviator named Catherine Bystock allegedly appears during summer sunsets. She died in a motorcycle accident close to the site and has since haunted the spot for over 60 years.

Image shows Military Working Dog sitting by a sign for RAF Odiham and pumpkins.

RAF Brawdy, Pembrokeshire

Groundskeeper Daffyd Glyn-Owen spotted a male Alsatian scrounging for scraps, behind the station kitchen of RAF Brawdy. With no collar or owner in sight, he adopted the stray and named him ‘Killer,’ as a joke on the dogs’ friendly nature.

One day, Killer snarled and refused to let a Halifax bomber take off. It eventually managed to take to the skies, never to be seen again.

Decades past and RAF Brawdy became a Naval air base. A helicopter crew heard snarling before discovering a major defect in an engine. Does the ghost of Killer remain vigilant over RAF Brawdy?

Thank-you to Forces News and the Air Historical Branch archives for sourcing the information on these spooky stories.

Image shows Military Working Dog sitting by a sign for RAF Odiham and pumpkins.